Mazda Vehicle Autonomy

2019 Mazda CX-3 Interior

If you have seen the movie “Minority Report,” it gives you a good idea of what the future of autonomous driving could look like. The driverless car industry has split autonomous driving technology into five levels. What you see in the movies, is level 5, meaning no human interaction required. Though many other automakers are working towards this goal, Mazda is taking a unique approach to vehicle autonomy.

Mazda has long been focused on giving drivers a thrilling driving experience. While having a car that can drive itself is a novel idea, it doesn’t offer any hands-on thrills. Instead, Mazda is focusing its future autonomous driving technology on being a supplemental function.

The Mazda Co-Pilot System would only activate if the driver needed help. For example, if the driver suffered a seizure or was attempting to drive while drunk.

Mazda deputy general manager Matsuhiro Tanaka articulated the company’s vision for autonomous tech. “What we are focused on is that it always has to be the joy of driving that comes first, then, should anything happen to the driver that renders the situation dangerous, then the autonomous driving functions will kick in and take them to a safe place.”

Tanaka went on to say that Mazda isn’t trying to develop a new technology. It is simply working to incorporate the existing technology in an innovative new way that will help protect the driver and everyone else on the road.

For more exciting news from this progressive automaker, contact us here at Wantagh Mazda. Or better yet, stop by in person to take a shiny new 2020 Mazda for a whirl.

Mazda Autonomous Drive Technology

With every passing year, more and more automakers are throwing their hat into the autonomous driving ring, and Mazda is no exception. But when it comes to self-driving cars, Mazda is unique in its approach. Keeping with its motto “Driving Matters,” Mazda wants to make cars with autonomous technology without sacrificing driver control.

 

Mazda CEO Masahiro Moro said point blank that “No steering wheel is not an option for us,” and went on to say that autonomous tech should be there to help drivers enjoy the car more, not make driver input impossible.

 

There are five levels of automation, ranging from hands-on automation like Adaptive Cruise Control (Level 1) and full autonomy in certain situations (Level 3) to Level 5, the steering wheel-free level that Mazda prefers to avoid.

 

Moro says that Level 4, where the car can drive safely in all situations without driver input, is as far as Mazda will go, and only if the technology allows “driving dynamics between the car and the driver.”

 

Mazda autonomous drive technology is still in development and won’t be available on Mazda vehicles for some time, but here at Wantagh Mazda, we’re thrilled that Mazda is dedicated to balancing its values with evolving technology and needs.